5 Important Social Media Trends You Must Know to Crush it in 2018

It’s a new year and that means new goals, new opportunities, and new trends you must know about to stay ahead of the curve.

We’re living through the greatest historical shift in communication since the printing press. Major social platforms, such as Facebook, Instagram, LinkedIn, and Twitter are where an increasing number of your audience is spending more of their time.

To be successful on social media requires one to be a practitioner who actually uses these digital communications platforms every day, keeping abreast of the constant changes they are making. Social media is an ever-changing landscape, so very little content regarding social media best practices and tactics is evergreen.

Social platforms are always rolling out new features, making algorithm tweaks that affects what kind of content gets seen, and making changes to their user interfaces. User behavior often dictates what changes these platforms make, but the changes made by the platforms also greatly affects user behavior and how people interact with the content you share.

Social media looks very different today from the way it looked in 2008, 2014, or even 2017. What follows is a list of what I believe to be the most important trends and tactics you need to know about to crush it on social media in 2018.  

Ephemeral Content

instagramstories.pngSnapchat was the first platform to introduce the concept of ephemeral social content or videos and images that automatically disappear 24 hours after posting. A piece of ephemeral content or a series of these posts is known as a story. In the summer of 2016, Instagram introduced its stories feature, which is very similar to Snapchat, and last year, Facebook adopted a stories feature as well.

While many brands may not understand it, users are loving stories. Whereas much of social media content is criticized for being heavily filtered, curated, and airbrushed, stories have a very authentic, current, in-the-moment, “right-now” kind of feel. Posts on Facebook or the Instagram grid tend to be high-quality, enhanced by filters and effects. It’s where most people showcase their best selves and agonize to make sure the lighting is just right. However, a story is often where people show a much simpler, less perfected, and more human side of themselves. Stories do not require nearly as much preparation and are usually used to document a typical day, cover an event, or periodically check in with the audience.

Instagram grid.PNG

Don’t go all in on the Instagram grid at the expense of stories.

On Instagram, the most popular network with stories, many people and brands are still putting all of their energy into posting on the grid, devoting insufficient time and attention to their daily stories. This is a mistake. Creating an Instagram story, which is a photo or a video under 15 seconds long, is quick to create and upload with one’s smartphone. Stories appear at the top of the Instagram feed. When you have a story published, your page shows up in the stories section at the top, and if you recently published a story that a user has not yet seen, your profile shows up at the top of their feed circled in red. See below:
Instagram Story Feed

Regularly publishing stories keeps you at the top of the feed and at the top of your audience’s mind. When users watch your story on a mobile device, your photo or video takes up their entire mobile screen, leaving them completely immersed in your brand. And, the more often they watch your stories, the more front-and-center your brand will be in their Instagram feed. So, make sure you don’t only post on the grid and neglect stories.

Stories foster a deeper level of engagement.

This is because a story can only be commented on or engaged with through a direct message (DM). A DM is a one-to-one private chat, which is a much more intimate and personal form of communication than a like or a reply to a public comment. Be sure to post interactive content such as questions or polls to stimulate DM responses and deeper engagement with your target audience.

Don’t give up on Snapchat.

When Instagram introduced stories, many brands were quick to dump Snapchat or post there a lot less frequently. However, data shows younger users under 30 are still spending a lot of time on the platform. If your brand targets customers in that demographic, then you need to continue using Snapchat and establishing a robust presence there. And, even if your business does not cater to that age-group, it’s still not a good idea to completely ignore it. Keep posting content on Snapchat, because that demo will get older and might soon become your customers. Also, remember that Snapchat could roll out a new feature tomorrow that wins back a lot of users and gets brands to come crawling back. If you’re unprepared, you will be caught behind the eight-ball.

Influencer Marketing

selfie-2916205_960_720

In 2014 and 2015 influencer marketing was a promising tactic that more brands were interested in trying out. No longer new, influencer marketing has grown and matured. Now, there is ample proof that it is a worthy investment of time and money.

The good news is that influencer marketing is still in its early years. Brands are seeing fantastic returns with relatively little spend, making it one of the most cost-effective forms of marketing in existence today.

Essentially, influencer marketing is a modern reinvention of PR or the celebrity endorsement. Brands court a social influencer — a person on social media with a large number of engaged followers, and the influencer will mention the brand in exchange for money, free product, or usually a combination of both.

Every social media platform has its own set of influencers. In the current climate, attention has never been so divided and hard to win. By partnering or collaborating with an influencer, you will be able to piggyback on the attention they already have and direct it back to your brand.

Micro-influencers are key.

A micro-influencer is a person on social media with a relatively small, but hyper-engaged following. While the number varies by study and platform, some classify a micro-influencer as someone with as little as 1,200 followers and as many as 40,000 (some go as high as 100,000). Studies show that these smaller influencers tend to have an audience that is disproportionately engaged and interested in the influencer’s posts compared to larger influencers whose audiences tend to be larger, more varied, and less proportionately engaged. Micro-influencers are also much cheaper to work with.

While big brands will still pay big money for the large influencers, such as celebrities or mega-social media influencers with significant returns, a lot of brands are achieving ROI by partnering with micro-influencers. A micro-influencer is often a person who posts about a specific, niche area of interest or hobby, such as nutrition and exercise, camping, video equipment, travel, or clothing. Their following extends beyond family and friends, but is still small enough that most of the followers are following influencer because they are truly interested in the influencer’s content and not because the influencer is popular.

Brands are becoming more savvy about who they work with, now understanding that a large follower-count doesn’t always translate to authentic engagement or return on investment. The cost of doing business with micro-influencers ranges from free product alone to a combination of free product and a relatively small amount of money, making it an extremely cost-effective option compared to spending on advertising or macro-influencers. All of the evidence shows that people increasingly trust the recommendations of friends and influencers over advertisements, making micro-influencers a great way to earn quality reach, impressions, awareness, engagement, and sales. Influencer marketing will continue to grow and become more expensive in coming years so the time to get in on this trend is now.

Tips for working with influencers:

1) Don’t be a control freak.

Another great thing about influencers is that they create the content for you. Avoid trying to wrestle creative control. Your influencer got to where they are because they are good at creating content and engaging with their audience. They have a good understanding of what their audience likes. Leave the content creation up to them and be empathetic to the fact that they cannot appear as a human advertisement. Therefore, the mention of your brand in their content will likely be subtle and smooth rather than overt, direct, and “advertise-y”.

2) Vet your influencers properly.

You don’t want to pick influencers with mostly inorganic or bot followers nor do you want influencers who don’t make sense for your brand. Even if an influencer is popular, they are a bad choice if they do not align with your brand’s values or have nothing to do with your space. The wrong influencer can do harm to your brand. Make sure the collaboration makes sense for your brand and your goals. Carefully evaluate their content, their engagement, and the image they give off. Tools like BuzzSumo and FollowerWonk can help you do it quickly and easily so you can scale your influencer outreach. If they are asking for a substantial amount of your marketing budget, do a little research to see if the influencer has achieved ROI-positive results for others.

3) Find brand ambassadors.

Brands are increasingly establishing long-term partnerships with influencers rather than one-off, spontaneous collaborations on just one post or campaign. Fomenting a long-term relationship with a credible influencer who aligns with your brand and acts as a brand ambassador can produce beneficial results for both parties.

Engagement & Direct Messaging

Brands are increasingly making use of direct messages, such as Facebook Messenger, Instagram DM, and LinkedIn DM as a way to communicate more directly with their audiences. DMs foster an intimate and personal form of communication and they are receiving positive responses from users. With so much content competing for people’s attention in feeds, a private message is a great way to grab a user’s attention. Private messages are even preferred rather than seen as an intrusion by some users who are tired of having all their social media activity publicly scrutinized.

Unlike email, this is one form of direct communication marketers have not yet killed and it’s expected to grow in 2018. As time goes on and users begin to receive more DMs from brands, the effectiveness of this tactic will probably diminish and receive less attention, so capitalize on it while you still can.  

Video

videoguy

Video has never been easier and cheaper to produce at scale. All of the major social media platforms now make it easy to create and upload videos and their algorithms heavily favor video content. They particularly favor video created or posted natively, with LinkedIn introducing native video just this past year. The rise of video began a few years ago, but we witnessed an explosion of video content in 2016 and 2017. This trend shows no sign of slowing down and it is expected to rise significantly. Video is predicted to account for over 80 percent of total online consumer Internet traffic by 2020.

People process video much more quickly than they do written text or even static images and more and more people are consuming content in video format. So, if most of your content is still blog posts and articles, it’s time to start churning out videos — long and short-form. If you don’t have a fancy video camera or equipment, no problem. Grab your phone and get to work. Video is no longer a ‘nice-to-have’, but a must-have for any business who wants to compete in 2018 and beyond.

Audio

podcasting getty_521931185_254656

Last year saw a tremendous increase in audio content. Although not strictly a part of social media, it’s a digital trend worth noting. Podcasts have become a popular way to consume media and information on the go. In fact, monthly podcast listeners increased 24% in 2017. Unlike video, a podcast can be played in the background so a user can benefit from the content while multitasking. Listeners can be driving, doing work, or cleaning the house as they catch up on their favorite podcast content. As the audio space begins to grow in importance, an increasing number of brands are launching their own podcasts and creating Alexa Skills and channels for Google home. Marketers are using social media to get the word out about their podcasts the same way they used to spread the word about their blogs and vlogs.

The democratization of content and media brought about by modern technology has put the power to create, publish, and spread messages directly into the hands of the people. While this makes it increasingly harder to get noticed in a noisy world, it also presents enormous opportunities for brands to connect with their audiences more cheaply and directly than ever before. The companies that are going to win in 2018 and beyond are the ones who take advantage of these new mediums of communication and use them to their advantage.

Advertisements

Should You Put Yourself Out There and Create a Personal Brand?

How much should you put yourself out there when you’re starting a business?

Should you develop a personal brand?

I think creating a personal brand and deciding whether or not to putting oneself out there is very much a personal decision that is up to the individual.

The first thing you’ll have to consider is whether or not you even want to have a personal brand. Many successful CEOs, founders, and businesspeople do not have personal brands and you’ve likely never heard of them. That’s a totally respectable and fair way to go about it.

Many people balk at the term “personal brand.” Some (usually older or more conservative folks in the business world) object to the term or the entire concept of a personal brand because they think it sounds narcissistic and phony. In their minds, a personal brand is something reserved for wanna-be gurus and charlatans or those “crazy millennials” walking around with their selfie sticks making silly Snapchat videos on their phones. There is a modern-day phenomenon of people who monetize an entire business off their personal brand. Unfortunately, some of these people create personal brands that are based on a false image they are trying to project through social media filters.

However, a personal brand is not a bad thing at all. If you don’t like the term personal brand, Vayner Media CEO, and branding expert, Gary Vaynerchuk suggests referring to it as managing your personal reputation. We can all agree that maintaining one’s reputation is important. All the more so in the age of the Internet. Even if you’re not saying anything about yourself or your business, it doesn’t mean others aren’t.

What is a personal brand? Contrary to what many people believe, a personal brand isn’t an excuse to shamelessly self-promote. Doing that is a quick way to turn people off. Successful personal brands are built on providing value and sharing quality content that engages the audience. Depending on your topic and audience, your content should educate, entertain, or inspire. Sometimes you can do all three!

It’s also very important to respond to comments and reach out to people who have greater influence or audience attention than you about collaborations. The one with greater influence has the leverage, so make sure to offer them something of value in exchange for whatever it is you want them to do for you.

A personal brand is your story. We all have a story to tell and even if you don’t think so, you can find a way to tell it in a way that is interesting to others. First, pick your area of expertise or your topic. It might be about your business or your field or it may be centered around a hobby or area of interest. Next, figure out the way you communicate best. It may be audio (e.g. podcast, audiobooks), written (e.g. blog posts, ebooks), or video. Then, find which distribution channels are the best way to reach your intended audience (e.g. Instagram, YouTube, Medium, LinkedIn, Soundcloud etc.).

I’m not saying that having a personal brand is for everybody. Not everybody wants to put themselves out there, be in front of a camera, have their writing published, or create content that is about who they are or what they do.

However, if it’s something you think you can get comfortable doing, then I strongly recommend trying it. Having a personal brand will be an increasingly more valuable asset in a 21-century world where content creation is democratized and the competition is fierce.

Alongside your company brand, you should consider developing your own personal brand as well. People have an easier time relating to other people than to entities or organizations (surprise, surprise). Sometimes the content from your personal brand can be the hook that reels people in and gets them interested in your business.

Zev Autumn selfie

If you’re a freelancer or a solopreneur, having a personal brand is essential. It’s what sets you apart from the rest and prevents you from becoming commoditized in the marketplace. A strong personal brand will get you picked for lucrative gigs. Not only that, but developing a personal brand can ensure that leads will come to you rather than you having to chase after them. If you’re an introvert or on the shy side, having a personal brand online that attracts people to come to you rather than the other way around is a G-dsend and this is probably the greatest time to be an introverted entrepreneur.

Let’s say you’re NOT an entrepreneur or a business owner. Is it still a good idea to have a personal brand?

Absofreakin’lutely!

In a competitive job market, it’s those with a strong online presence and establish thought leadership, competence, and credibility through their online content and published work that will get the job over equally qualified candidates who choose to rely solely on their resumes. When you apply for a job, one of the first things your prospective employer will do is look you up on LinkedIn. Are you going to have a blank, gray, faceless avatar staring back at them or a profile that hasn’t been updated in years with none of your recent work?

If you’re interested in developing your personal brand, but aren’t sure how to go about it, then I recommend this fantastic book by blogger and business consultant, Mark Schaefer: KNOWN: The handbook for building and unleashing your personal brand in the digital age.

In this handy guide, Schaefer takes you by the hand and walks you through the process of figuring out what to talk about, where to talk about it, and how to become known in your space or area of interest. There is also a supplemental workbook available with helpful exercises to get you started. Recently, I had the pleasure of interviewing him and that interview will soon be published in the Huffington Post and on my upcoming podcast.

If you decide to create a personal brand, be forewarned that it does involve some risk and vulnerability. You have to have the stomach to handle occasional negative comments. You also have to decide how much of yourself to expose. To a certain extent, being raw, real, and authentic will help you win attention and a following like never before and much of the business world is becoming less stuffy and buttoned up thanks to the Internet and startup culture. However, you have to figure out where to draw the line between what you feel comfortable sharing and what is too personal or NSFW.

Also, keep in mind that colleagues who think having a personal brand is unprofessional or self-indulgent might poke fun or criticize you for doing it. Some companies have strict guidelines about what you can or cannot say publicly, which you should be familiar with if you’re concerned about losing your job. Consider that now may not be the right time in your life yet to do it and that’s ok. Have an honest conversation with yourself about whether or not you are ready to start building your personal brand.

Have you developed a personal brand or are you interested in doing so? Do you communicate best on audio, video, or in writing and what channels do you prefer to use? Do you have any questions or tips you’d like to share?

Please let me know in the comments!

How Do You Know When You’ve Found Your Passion?

While it may differ slightly for every individual, I think you know that you’ve found your passion when…

You love it so much that you forget to eat (some say when you forget to shit).

When I was in school, my favorite subject was lunchtime. School was not my passion.

When I worked for other people, it was nice to get out of the office and grab some food or to take a lunch break. I wasn’t so into whatever it was I was supposed to be doing.

When I’m forced to do anything I don’t want to do for an inordinate amount of time, I start to get hungry or sleepy or bored and usually, I start mindlessly checking my phone scrolling aimlessly until someone tells me I’m being rude. It doesn’t take a lot to bore me, so please don’t take offense.

However, when I’m writing or doing some sort of creative pursuit or get involved in a self-started business endeavor, the opposite is true. I enter into this almost trance-like zone (Don’t let me get in my zone, cuz I’m definitely in my zone). Everything else seems to fall away. The notifications beep and it’s almost as if I don’t hear them (unless I’m involved in an interesting conversation and that’s why I’m getting notifications).

Sometimes, it can be hard to get time to pen a blog post or shoot a video, but when I actually sit down and do it, I get sucked in. All in. When I do client work or write something for a client on a subject that I find interesting, I go into a similar level of hyperfocus. When I’m putting thoughts to paper (or screen), I can lose track of time. I forget to eat. If I have to go to the bathroom, I hold it in (or continue working in what I like to call the corner office). Not to get graphic, but keeping it real. I think that’s a sign that writing (and creating and entrepreneur-ing) is my passion.

One thing I’ve been slowly learning as an entrepreneur is that I cannot and should not do everything and that it’s ok. It’s good to delegate areas in which I’m less proficient or less passionate to others. And, even though I’m not at a point where I can do much delegating, the process of doing nearly everything myself is helping me gain awareness of what I’m interested in doing and what I should delegate or outsource in the future.

So, what’s your passion?

If you’re not doing it, why not? If you’re not pursuing your passion at least as a hobby, then it’s probably not really your passion. Don’t call yourself a writer if you barely write or an artist if the last time you created something was back in high school and now you’re 40.

If you would like a shot at being able to do your passion for a living or as a side-hustle or simply as a means of sharing it with others and connecting with like-minded people, then the best thing you can do is create content around it. Maybe it will find an audience. Maybe it won’t. But, if it’s your passion, then you now have the tools and the access to share it with others and potentially even get recognized for it. Furthermore, if you create content around something that’s your passion, it will be more authentic and people will pick up on it. Your passion will be infectious.

Creating a blog, vlog, or a podcast about your passion or interest may lead to speaking gigs, brand sponsorships, and free stuff. Or, it may simply enable you to meet and connect with others into the same thing. Either way, you now have the ability to explore your passions and interests and showcase your thoughts or creations with many people quickly and easily. Creating and publishing written, video, or audio content is far easier and cheaper than it ever was before.

So, take a chance.

Skip lunch and go do something that takes your mind off food.

 

 

 

There is No Reason You Can’t Start Now

Perhaps, it’s because Yom Kippur (the Jewish holiday of atonement) starts tonight, but I’m feeling introspective and reflective right now.

I humbly urge you to start creating and sharing content if you haven’t already. If you already put stuff out there, then I encourage you to do it more frequently and consistently. Not everyone can afford a staff or a production team, but the good news is that you do not need one. All you need is a mobile device and a wifi connection. Oh, and talent, hustle, and ambition.

I’m not directing my plea only to businesses or professionals. I’m talking to the creators. The artists. The bored housewife in Iowa who always knew she had a talent for making others laugh or the retired accountant who really wanted to write short stories, but was told that it wasn’t practical. It is now practical. The Internet has made starting your own business practical. The market now rewards art and creativity more than before and we are all media companies now. Thanks to social media, blogging, email, and the mobile device, we can all create and publish content.

Creating content from your laptop or mobile device in written (blog posts, articles on Medium and LinkedIn), audio (podcast), or visual (videos, vlogs, graphics) form about the thing you enjoy can help you build a following, which you can monetize into a small business or side-hustle or leverage to raise money or awareness for worthy causes or other things you support and believe in. The cost and the barriers to entry are so low and the gatekeepers are far less relevant than they used to be.

It doesn’t take much money or time to create content and share it with others. Chances are if you’re honest with yourself, you likely spend a lot of time doing things that prevent you from spending time on things that can get you to the next level in your life or achieve goals, and I don’t mean only financial ones. There’s plenty of things I don’t get around to, but I know it’s because I haven’t yet made them enough of a priority.

And the truth is, this entire rant or manifesto or plea to create content is as much intended for me as it is for all of you. The fact is that I know I could be creating so much more while still getting all the other things I need to do if I decide to look in the mirror, drop my own excuses, and push myself to do and accomplish more.

To Win, You Need to Make the Time

You want your brand to get noticed?

You want the leads to come to you?

You want to grow your business?

Then you need to create content.

You need to create quality content that provides value to your target audience on platforms that have your audience’s attention, such as Facebook, LinkedIn, Instagram, and Twitter frequently and persistently.

Depending on your brand, your content might be entertaining, educational, or inspiring. It might be helpful, motivational, or funny. But, it must provide value to your audience and the content must be in the right context — shared at the right time, for the right people, and created in a way that it appears native to the platforms on which it appears.

Sunday-well-spent-life-quotes-sayings-pictures

You will only succeed once you commit yourself to creating content on a consistent basis and sharing it with the world. There is enough time. But you have to be willing to sacrifice some nights and weekends or times when everybody else is enjoying their leisure.

Most of your content creation is not going to take place during your traditional work hours. You’ll never get the time. You have to make the time. Set aside a block of time each week for creating content or working on your content distribution strategy. A little planning will take you or your organization a long way.

In a world where there is so much competition for consumer attention, it takes a great deal of effort to get the market to care about what you’re doing. Content marketing is not a short term marketing strategy. Even if you create good content, you need to earn audience engagement consistently. It takes many interactions before a purchase is made. But, if you stick with it, focus on the needs of your audience, and commit to providing them with as much value as possible, you will eventually build a brand and earn your audience’s trust. Once you have their trust and their attention, your hard work will pay off.

It takes a lot of time and effort to amass brand equity, but once you have it, you can leverage it to advance your business objectives. However, to stay on top, you will need to continue putting out content and keep the momentum going.

Content marketing cannot be seen as something “extra” for whenever you get around to it. As entrepreneur, vlogger, and marketer, Gary Vaynerchuk so aptly puts it, most brands are playing it “half-pregnant” and that’s why they never see results. You need to invest the time, money, and people to create and distribute content effectively. If you want to reap the rewards of content marketing, then you need to understand that it doesn’t happen overnight. To break through the noise, it takes a ton of patience, grind, and scaling the unscalable.

If you’re not ready to do the work and you can’t afford to invest the resources necessary to make it happen, then you’re not yet ready for branding and content marketing. To succeed with content marketing, you need to go all in and stay focused.

Good Things Come to Those Who Work Their Butt Off and are Patient AF

We’ve all heard the expression:

“Good things come to those who wait.”

Well, I’m here to tell you that it’s bullsh*t.

No one ever achieved big things without working their ass off and going out and getting it. Every successful person I know has had to work hard. Even people who raise boatloads of cash or enjoy family connections will not be profitable without grinding day in and day out. Sure, there are people who win the lotto or were handed a lucrative venture, but you and I can’t point to anyone who earned lasting success by not giving it their all. There are many gurus and coaches on the Internet selling mastermind courses these days with “get rich quick” schemes who claim they have a hack for getting successful without all the work. Some of their suggestions may turn a profit for a short time, but will not bring lasting wealth. There really are no shortcuts to success. There is no simple formula, growth hack, or automated process that will enable you to win long-term.

I’m currently in the process of building a digital marketing agency as well as my own online presence and personal brand. Having interviewed many successful people for my Huffington Post column and studied many people who built a business, personal brand, or an online presence, the common themes I’m seeing and applying to my own life are as follows:

Patience: 

It takes so much patience to achieve any big, hairy, audacious goal. If you love it and it’s worth pursuing, you’ll likely have the fortitude to stick it out when the going gets tough. Oh, and it will get tough. We look at many successful people today as “finished products.” We didn’t see them before they achieved greatness. We don’t see the countless hours of painstaking effort and unglamorous amounts of dedication they put into refining their craft. It doesn’t make for good TV (or whatever medium you use for entertainment these days). There’s always this temptation to try to jump ahead several steps before you’ve made it. And it can be discouraging when you go through a dry-spell. You need to remain humble and continue to do things you may feel you shouldn’t have to still be doing if you want to get to the place where you aspire to be. It’s called paying your dues.

Persistence:

If you’re patient and appreciate every small victory, you’ll have an easier time remaining motivated and persisting toward your goals. Let’s take influencers as an example. Many of them churned out hundreds of blog posts, videos, and podcasts that barely got any reads, views, or listens before they seemingly “popped” out of nowhere. They didn’t get discouraged when no one was paying attention them because they believed in themselves and persisted. The truth is even if you do everything right and you produce quality work or churn out great content frequently and consistently, it will still likely take years of doing it before you break out and become well-known.

Consistency: 

This one is so crucial. They say a big part of success is just showing up. I’d like to suggest an addendum to that old adage: A big part of success is just showing up consistently. Even if you’re talented, produce great work, have good ideas, and spend time honing your craft and working toward your goals, you will not go very far if you’re on-again, off-again, hot and cold. This is true for many endeavors in life, but specifically, when it comes to building an online presence, no one wins the market’s attention and becomes known for anything if they don’t consistently put out value. Even if you have one big piece of content that goes viral, you’ll be a one-hit wonder that no one remembers and have no brand recognition unless you consistently follow up and engage your audience. Every drop in the bucket counts. The key is consistently working on your goal and not allowing yourself to get distracted or make excuses.

Sometimes life gets in the way or we see something that looks like it might be more interesting or exciting, but the show must go on. Only by sticking with it, remaining patient when we don’t see results for long periods of time, persisting in the face of obstacles and applying ourselves consistently, will we achieve any of our dreams.

Who Cares What They Think?

Recently, a client sent me the following message:

“Most of the people that I’m getting attention from on Facebook are all the people I am not so interested in sharing that part of my life with.”

When I explained to her that it’s impossible to ONLY reach the people whom she wants to buy her service without also attracting the attention of others, she replied with a text that revealed what was truly worrying her:

“It’s just weird when I walk down the street and ppl are like u started a business?? If it doesn’t work out I would die of embarrassment.”

So often, what really holds us back is a fear of failure or, more truthfully, a fear of what other people will think or say if we fail.

But, as I explained to her, what will happen will happen regardless of whether people know about it or not. And, if you want to get on the radar screens (or mobile, tablet, or desktop screens) of your target audience, there’s no way you will be able to escape also getting attention from people who know you or people you don’t necessarily want to know about your business venture. Today, it’s impossible to hide if you want to make an impact and attract any sort of attention.

And, if they judge, so what? Most people who judge or poke fun are people who are jealous, insecure, or too cowardly to do something themselves. Most people lack the courage and conviction to try.

Let your metric for success be: Putting yourself out there and making the attempt.

That’s already so much more than what others will do. A huge part of sucess is just showing up — and showing up day in and day out, again and again. Persistence and perseverance is a common thread that weaves together between most success stories. And a great number attempts — even failed ones — will increase your likelihood of doing something that actually succeeds. As Seth Godin says, “the one who fails the most, wins.”

Don’t allow your fear of failure or the negative comments of the naysayers get in your way of trying your damnest to make your dreams a reality! If it doesn’t work, you can always learn from it and try something new. But, don’t waste your time worrying about the thoughts of others, many of whom are simply not brave enough to do what you are doing.